The Cats and the Count


I got this papier mache vampire last year, but never put up the photos of the cats I managed to corral into posing with it. This is one of the goofiest decorations I have.

Buster with Count Bobblehead

Buster, looking his demonic best with the red eyes. The better to impress the Count with, I suppose.

Gracie and Count Bobblehead

Princess Gracie, patiently posing with Count Bobblehead.

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28 thoughts on “The Cats and the Count

    • maryjblog says:

      Does Gracie stake out particular spots on the floor? Do they ever change? Kitty had one spot in the corner of the dining room all summer; she abandoned that one day for a chair pulled up under the table, draped behind the tablecloth. Suddenly this week, she has rejected the dining room altogether in favor of a little perch on the back of the couch. Her habits seem to be driven by a strange logic that only she understands.

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    • maryjblog says:

      I love dogs, and want one very badly, but I got the cat back when I was working & commuting similar hours to DD’s. That was 15 years ago, and even though now I work on a more dog-friendly schedule, Kitty grows more imperious & territorial with each passing year, and I don’t have the heart to try & make her change her ways at this advanced age, if such a thing were even possible.

      Do you have a pup currently, Gypsy?

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  1. Digital Dame says:

    Heh, well, no, but that’s another thing I don’t have time for. When you’re gone from home 11 hours a day like I am, it wouldn’t be fair to the dog to be left alone so much. Cats are fine on their own, but dogs not so much. I miss having a dog, but I can’t do it right now 😦

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  2. sarah magdalene says:

    More strange coincidences! Buster looks very much like my Tonkinese, though mine is fatter, he is exactly the same colouring. I also have a smaller darker cat (a Burmese), who appears on the Devil card.

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  3. Digital Dame says:

    Oh interesting! It could be Buster is a Tonkinese then (actually that was my first suspicion, but it seemed unlikely there’d be a stray Tonkinese wandering around this town. But who knows?) rather than a Siamese. Since he was a stray, we have no idea what he really is. All I know is he’s a punk, and gets in fights FAR too often.

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    • sarah magdalene says:

      Yeah! Mine is a big bully. He beats up the whole street in the ten minutes per day he’s not being a rug seal. Certainly body and face shape wise Buster looks very Tonk. And the colours are an exact match. Looks like he has ice blue eyes, very light and you can see the Burmese shape in him.

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  4. Digital Dame says:

    Aha, must be something with the breed then being so aggressive. I had a vet suggest somewhat obliquely that I was an irresponsible pet owner for letting him go outdoors where he’d get into fights. As if I could turn this brute into a housecat after all these years. Yeah, he runs the neighborhood. He chases dogs, got into it with a couple raccoons in the front yard last night but even he retreated from them.

    Yes, his eyes are the bright blue. You’re probably right, he probably is a Tonk then. Wonder where he came from, they’re not exactly common around here.

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    • sarah magdalene says:

      Vets always say that. But mine are very happy with their freedom, and I think that makes them healthy. A bored confined animal is a sick animal. My friend is very good at patching up fight wounds luckily. Mine had a fight with a fox one day (a BIG fox too…I sometimes think he is part dingo). He was smart enough to run from that XD.
      His full brother isn’t aggressive though (my dad has him)…I think mine was the first born alpha of the litter. My dads female Burmese on the other hand, is a total psycho, and really has to be kept in, because she is SO tiny (3 kilo i think) but insists on picking fights.

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  5. Digital Dame says:

    Ooo, I had a psycho kitty once. Can’t say I shed any tears when she died. She’s a long story, though. She wasn’t a fighter so much as just generally unpleasant, perpetually cranky, couldn’t pet her or she’d scratch or bite.

    I don’t think we have foxes around here, but we do have coyotes (although I’ve never seen any in my yard). Hopefully Buster would be smart enough to steer clear of them, or he’d end up as a Happy Meal.

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    • sarah magdalene says:

      My dads cat is nice to her human slaves, but not nearly as nice as my male Burm, who is LOVE incarnate. If you want purrsonality, always choose a male cat.
      Here is my Tonk so you can compare the colours…

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  6. maryjblog says:

    Some of these vets get a little carried away. I have always kept my cat indoors, as there’s a tempting shortcut to a major highway nearby. We’ve had her since she was 6 weeks old so she doesn’t know any different, but every once in a while she slips out between somebody’s legs and goes for a little stroll around the perimeter of the house. I mentioned that once to a vet, and she gave me this look as though I’d told her I use the cat for target practice. She wrote it down in some file and it was in Kitty’s Permanent Record for a long time, as though I were some kind of animal molester.

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  7. Digital Dame says:

    Holy crap. Sure, they’re safer if they stay indoors, but let us not forget, they are in fact animals. They may have been bred in captivity, but even my dear, departed Charlotte was an indoor/outdoor cat. Buster has always lived the bulk of his life outdoors, coming in to eat and when the weather is bad, but mostly he likes to be outdoors. I can’t take that away from him at this point in his life (he’s at least 9, we’re not really sure), that would be cruel. I agree, some of these vets are nuts. And we’d all be safer from injuries and disease if we never left our houses or went further than the street we live on, too.

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    • maryjblog says:

      I think that some vets & “animal advocates” also forget that people brought up in different parts of the country and different parts of the world treat their animals differently – what’s considered safe and acceptable for a cat or dog in an urban area is quite different than on a farm, or in a remote rural area.

      In the Catskills where we spend a lot of weekends, very few people walk their dogs on leashes, as suburbanites do: they just open the door, let ’em out, and let ’em back in when they come home. It is considered absolutely normal up there, and I know that these folks love their dogs and consider them family. But every weekend you see people from downstate and the city pulling over, checking the phone #s on the dogs’ collars, and calling up the owners on their overpriced smartphones, trying to convince them to be “responsible pet owners” by keeping their dogs indoors or tied up (the acoustics in the mountains are fantastic – I’ve heard many of these arguments word-for-word, just b/c the window’s open in my dining room.). They just don’t understand that it is a different culture up there, and that the multi-culti movement should also mean being openminded about people of your own race, who grew up in a different part of the state and don’t drive a late-model Volvo.

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      • gypsyscarlett says:

        Here, many people don’t use leashes when they walk their dog. I was really worried at first when I saw this, because I feared the dog being hit by traffic.

        But I swear, I’ve never seen better behaved dogs anywhere.
        I once read a hilarious post from an expat declaring that dogs in Germany weren’t normal because they were so freakishly well-behaved. I wish I could find the link.

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      • Digital Dame says:

        Figures. I wonder what they do to train them there? It always amazes me how everyone you ever meet will tell you what an expert dog trainer they are, but then when you see their ill-behaved pooch… There’s a lot more to dog training than yelling at them, or tugging on a leash.

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  8. Digital Dame says:

    That just strikes me as arrogant self-righteousness. They’re probably more pissed that because the dog was running loose they had to slow down or swerve their car to avoid it. God forbid anyone or anything inconvenience them. Of course they wouldn’t say that on the phone, they’ll get all sanctimonious and act like their only concern is for the animal. PUH-leeeze. I will say I’m not wild about dogs running loose, mostly because you never know if they’ll bite and I’ve had enough stray dogs around my house here raise their hackles and growl and bark at me in my own yard. One used to come over from next door frequently until my son chased him off with a hockey stick and yelled at the owners. Never a pleasant experience.

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  9. maryjblog says:

    Oh, I wouldn’t do it myself, but that’s both my choice, and the custom where I live most of the time. As you said, keeping your dog on a leash is a perfectly reasonable idea – telling people how to live, in that sanctimonious way, is bullsh!t.

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